Lab Test Glossary E

Eosinophil count: An eosinophil count measures the number of eosinophils in the blood. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell whose levels are most commonly elevated in patients with allergies (e.g., hay fever and asthma) and parasitic infections. Eosinophils are also active in other disorders, including eczema, leukemia, and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Low numbers of eosinophils may be seen in individuals taking corticosteroid medications, infections that produce pus, or alcohol intoxication. Eosinophils do not respond to bacterial or viral infections.
Eosinophil percentage: A type of white blood cell called eosinophils make up ~3% of all white blood cells in the bloodstream. The eosinophil percentage is most commonly elevated in patients with allergies (e.g., hay fever and asthma) and parasitic infections. Conditions that lower the percentage include infections that produce pus, alcohol intoxication, and use of corticosteroid medications.
Eotaxin: Eotaxin is a protein produced by epithelial cells, endothelial cells and eosinophils. Levels of eotaxin may become elevated in response to allergic reactions or inflammation.
Epidermal Growth Factor (egf): Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a protein that stimulates normal cell growth, cancerous cell growth, and wound healing. Significant elevations have been implicated in the development and progression of solid tumors including those of the lung, breast, prostate, colon, ovary, head, and neck.
Epithelial neutrophil Activating peptide 78 (enA 78): Epithelial neutrophil activating peptide 78 (ENA 78) is a protein found in abundance in the synovial or joint fluid and blood of people with rheumatoid arthritis. ENA 78 is also expressed by epithelial cells in people with Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, acute appendicitis, and allergic airway inflammation. Additionally, elevated levels can be seen in some people with non-small cell lung cancer.
Epstein-Barr nuclear Antigen (ebnA) IGM Antibody: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a virus that causes infectious mononucleosis. Infection with EBV is common and occurs most frequently in late adolescence or early adulthood. Once infected with EBV, individuals develop virus-specific antibodies. Viral capsid antigen antibodies appear first. The presence of these antibodies is usually detectable at presentation and lasts approximately 1-2 months. Early antigen antibodies appear next or are present with the viral capsid antigen antibodies early in the course of the illness. As a person recovers, viral capsid antigen and early antigen antibodies decrease and nuclear antigen antibodies appear. The nuclear antigen antibody persists for life and reflects a past infection. After the person is well, viral capsid antigen and nuclear antigen antibodies are always present, but at lower levels.
Epstein-Barr Viral Capsid Antigen (VCA) IGM Antibody: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a virus that causes infectious mononucleosis. Infection with EBV is common and occurs most frequently in late adolescence or early adulthood. Once infected with EBV, individuals develop virus-specific antibodies. Viral capsid antigen antibodies appear first. The presence of these antibodies is usually detectable at presentation and lasts approximately 1-2 months. Early antigen antibodies appear next or are present with the viral capsid antigen antibodies early in the course of the illness. As a person recovers, viral capsid antigen and early antigen antibodies decrease and nuclear antigen antibodies appear. The nuclear antigen antibody persists for life and reflects a past infection. After the person is well, viral capsid antigen and nuclear antigen antibodies are always present, but at lower levels.
Epstein-Barr Virus early Antigen (eA) igM Antibody: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a virus that causes infectious mononucleosis. Infection with EBV is common and occurs most frequently in late adolescence or early adulthood. Once infected with EBV, individuals develop virus-specific antibodies. Viral capsid antigen antibodies appear first. The presence of these antibodies is usually detectable at presentation and lasts approximately 1-2 months. Early antigen antibodies appear next or are present with the viral capsid antigen antibodies early in the course of the illness. As a person recovers, viral capsid antigen and early antigen antibodies decrease and nuclear antigen antibodies appear. The nuclear antigen antibody persists for life and reflects a past infection. After the person is well, viral capsid antigen and nuclear antigen antibodies are always present, but at lower levels.
Erythropoietin (epo): Erythropoietin (EPO) is a hormone produced by the kidneys in response to low levels of oxygen in the blood. EPO stimulates bone marrow to increase production of red blood cells, which then carry more oxygen through the blood stream. Increased levels of EPO can be seen in a variety of anemias and in renal and adrenal cancers. Occasionally athletes abuse this hormone in order to increase the oxygen carrying capacity of their blood. Decreased EPO levels can be seen with polycythemia vera (rare disorder of the bone marrow) and certain kidney diseases.
Estradiol: Estradiol is the most potent of the three major naturally occurring estrogens. Estradiol is responsible for growth of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and vagina; breast development; maturation of the external genitals; deposition of body fat in a female distribution; and ending linear growth during adolescence. Estradiol also stimulates the proliferation of the uterine lining in the first half of the menstrual cycle. Estradiol levels are used to assess fertility, amenorrhea (lack of menstruation), and precocious puberty (the onset of signs of puberty before age seven or eight) in girls.
Estriol, Unconjugated: One of the three major naturally occurring estrogens, estriol is a hormone that is produced almost exclusively during pregnancy (by the placenta). An estriol measurement is used to establish fetal status and placental function during pregnancy and may be useful as an early indicator of Down syndrome. Maternal unconjugated estriol levels increase rapidly following the first trimester. Although low estriol levels may be seen in a variety of fetal problems, measurement has been most useful in diabetic mothers, post-date gestation, and intrauterine growth retardation.
Unilab Express is HIPAA Compliant Unilab Express Satisfaction Guarantee

Privacy Policy | About Us | Contact Us | Glossary | Logo Map


   
      


ANY TIME LAB locations are preferred collection sites for well-known clinical and toxicology laboratories.